A Topography of Chance

June 26, 2014—September 20, 2014

This group exhibition is inspired by Daniel Spoerri’s An Anecdoted Topography of Chance, a classic Fluxus artist book. Like Spoerri’s publication, the artworks suggest that chance is not random, but shaped by rituals and repetition. Through a broad range of media, Bruce Nauman, Brie Ruais, Rose Marcus, and Aaron Garber-Maikovska explore the predictability of the accident and the fortuity of pattern, especially those mediated by the body.

Bruce Nauman (b. 1941, Fort Wayne, IN).

In Setting a Good Corner (Allegory and Metaphor) (1991), Nauman constructs a fence on his ranch in New Mexico for the length of the fifty-minute video. The static camera captures the artist while he digs holes, secures foundations and sets tension wires. The work expands Nauman’s studio to embrace his backyard and captures his distinctive rhythms. Always a protagonist in his work, Nauman’s activity ends up framing himself with his fence.

Brie Ruais (b. 1982, Santa Ana, CA).

Ruais works with clay, kneading, pushing, kicking, tearing and squeezing it. The resulting forms are abstract and intimately tied to physical action. Double Fold and Unfold, 130lbs is partly titled after her body weight, while Holding a Good Corner, 266lbs (2014) shows the trace of repetitive gestures made by Ruais and her boyfriend. Her work suggests a battle between persistence and gravity, human determination and the power of materials.

Rose Marcus (b. 1982, Atlanta, GA).

Marcus’s photographs explore liminal times and spaces, directing our attention to the lulls in between the action and the locations that are rarely the main attraction. Printed on vinyl and adhered directly to the wall, the works in this new series capture reflections, positioning store windows and urban glass as lenses into another dimension. Often containing the artist’s own reflection, these photographs suggest the “aesthetic stubbornness,” as Marcus puts it, of our cities and ourselves.

Aaron Garber-Maikovska (b. 1978, Washington DC)

is a performance artist who makes works in a range of media, including videos of elaborate hand dances and abstract paintings that involve highly ambiguous gestures. Garber-Maikovska’s paintings are suggestive of graffiti, Chinese characters, anthropomorphic figures and pictograms. Composed from doodles drawn on acetate then projected at a totemic scale, they are charged with performative energy that has been described as a “future comedy.”

photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Bruce Nauman
Setting a Good Corner (Allegory and Metaphor), 1999
Video (color, sound)
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Spread Open to the Floor, 130 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Spread Open to the Floor, 130 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Holding a Good Corner, 266 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Arm, 2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Folded (arms), 2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Man (cartesian?), 2013/2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Travel (turing), 2013/2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Untitled, 2014
Ink on chalk pastel on archival gator board, in artist’s frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Untitled, 2014
Ink on chalk pastel on archival gator board, in artist’s frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Sheila, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Jeanette with kids, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Larry, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
T.G.I.Friday’s, 2014
HD Video and metal armature

Inners

February 27, 2014—June 5, 2014

fused space is pleased to present “Inners,” a site-specific exhibition of new work by Julian Hoeber, curated by Jessica Silverman. Using a range of media, including installation, wall sculptures, paintings and works on paper, the show explores the formal and psychological aspects of symmetry, distortion, inside and outside. Rich in art historical associations, the work is in dialogue with artists as diverse as Hans Arp, Lygia Clark, Sol LeWitt, Mike Kelley and Joe Goode.

The show centers on an installation of two impractical staircase-like structures. One set of “stairs” ascends to nowhere; the other lies on its side, rendered as a zigzagged wall. Each staircase creates a sequestered space within the gallery. Hoeber has made enclosures that are both peculiar closets and hiding places, which have intense cultural connotations. Inside these “rooms” are paintings and works on paper that allude to more colorful, irrational, organic forms.

Julian Hoeber

Julian Hoeber (b. 1974) holds a B.A. in Art History from Tufts University, a B.F.A from the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an M.F.A. from the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. His work has been included in exhibitions at the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL; Western Bridge, Seattle, WA; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, CA; and Deste Foundation Centre for Contemporary Art, Athens.

photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Blue Wound, 2013
Acrylic on linen
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #80 (CS, Q1, URJ, LC, Q2, ULJ, LC, Q3, LRJ, LC, Q4, LLJ, LC), 2014
Acrylic on panel
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #81 (CS, Q1, CJ, DC, Q2, CJ, DC, Q3, LMJ, DC, Q4, RMJ, DC), 2014
Acrylic on panel
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #82, 83 (CS, Q1, URJ, DC, Q2, ULJ, DC, Q3, URJ, DC, Q4, LLJ, DC) (CS, Q1, URJ, DC, Q2, ULJ, DC, Q3, LRJ, DC, Q4, ULJ, DC), 2014
Acrylic on linen
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Pussies, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Little Cave, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #18, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #19, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #20, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #21, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #22, 2013
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #24, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #25: Good Fuck, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave X, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Asshole, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Schematic #1, 2014
Gesso and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Schematic #2, 2014
Gesso and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #3, 2014
Gouache and collage on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #4, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #5, 2014
Gouache and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #6, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #7, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Offset Rectangle Cave, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Diptych, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Untitled (Limbs), 2014
Cherry wood with oil and wax finish, glass, epoxy, polyester resin, fiberglass, and acrylic paint
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Study #1, 2013
Colored pencil and graphite on brown paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Painting #1, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014

architecture undigested

October 9, 2013—January 10, 2014

“architecture undigested” features artists whose works engage with the built environment in surreal and thought-provoking ways. The exhibition presents a range of works that riff on building elements from moving walls and misplaced window blinds to casino carpets and anti-slip guards gone rogue. The cumulative effect suggests an imploded house - one that subverts the distinction between structure and adornment. Although these works resist the use of exotic and expensive materials and thwart the comforts of home, they bring an odd intimacy to what might otherwise be perceived as industrial.

The show includes works by Marte Eknæs, Petros Moris, Brian O’Connell, Ruairiadh O’Connell, Mitzi Pederson, Stephen Prina, Ben Schumacher and Hugh Scott-Douglas.

“architecture undigested” is curated by Jessica Silverman.

Marte Eknæs

(b. 1978, Elverum, Norway). Eknæs’s Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna) (2013), is a ten-foot-long door-sweep hung six inches above the floor. Similarly, Anti-slip III (Gråmølna) (2013), is an anti-slip guard installed in the wrong place. Both works transform the practical accessories of public buildings into thought-provoking sculptures. Eknæs is known for her interrogative approach to materials and concern for the structure of man-made objects.

Petros Moris

(b. 1986, Lamia, Greece). Moris’s Commons 2, 3 and 4 (2013) are three hybridic works, which fuse mosaics with pure gray colorfields. Moris has coated three foam construction panels with synthetic polymer plaster that has been reinforced with glass-fiber. He then mounts a mosaic of unglazed ceramic tiles onto the surface, creating a fragmented mural space. He uses pre-industrial, industrial and post-industrial techniques to create works that look like science-fiction antiques.

Brian O’Connell

(b. 1972, Leuven, Belgium). O’Connell’s “Concrete Paintings” are made by pouring concrete into wooden molds, which then twist and bend under the weight of the added material. The works refer to Brutalist architecture’s use of molded concrete, but further subvert their industrial materials by containing them within the framework of traditional painting. These “paintings” are connected to O’Connell’s practice of interrogating the interrelated natures of weight, pressure, and light—examining behaviors of various materials.

Ruairiadh O’Connell

(b. 1983, Aberdeen, Scotland). O’Connell’s three wax-based silkscreens hijack their designs from casino carpets that are meant to keep gamblers awake and ambitious, transforming them into pure studies of motif and pattern. By transforming their materials and taking the patterns from the floor to the wall (thereby elevating their positions), the resulting artworks disrupt the intended spatial and psychological functions of their sources.

Mitzi Pederson

(b. 1976, Stuart, Florida). Pederson’s sculptures are made from shattered cinderblocks, arranged in low, horizontal configurations. Their edges are lined with black and gray glitter. In these works, conventional concrete masonry shatters and takes on a formal beauty.

Stephen Prina

(b. 1954, Galesburg, Illinois). Prina’s window-blind works, which are made on conventionally produced linen roller blinds, function both as paintings and sculptural installations. The application of brilliant colors with abstract, gestural brushstrokes on household material recalls the work of modernists such as Piet Mondrian and Barnet Newman. Positioned in the center of the room, their painterly surfaces double as architectural bodies that reorient the gallery’s space.

Ben Schumacher

(b. 1985, Kitchener, Canada). Schumacher’s sculpture, Vogue Apr-Mar 1986 (2012) is a vertical, glass partition covered with perforated vinyl used in commercial advertising, held together by a cable-management rack. The work disrupts visibility, yet hints at transparency. The microfilm transfers and vinyl on the backside of the work simultaneously allow perception through a facade and create a surface embedded with information and imagery.

Hugh Scott-Douglas

(b. 1988, Cambridge, UK). Scott-Douglas’s “road-cases” are multi-functional objects that act simultaneously as sculptures, movable walls and frames. The road-cases also display two kinds of Scott-Douglas’s paintings: Chopped Bill (2013) is made from a high resolution scan of the small ink stamps found on American $100 bills; the other, Torn Cheque (2013), is an abstract pattern on a white gessoed canvas made by a laser cutter. The works suggest the incessant travel of information, objects, currency, and people through space.

photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna), 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna), 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Anti-slip VI, 2013
non-slip tape
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Petros Moris
Commons02, 2013
Commons03, 2013
Commons05, 2013
unglazed fired ceramic tiles, extruded polystyrene rigid foam construction panels coated with synthetic polymer plaster and reinforced with glass-fibre
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Brian O’Connell
Untitled #14, 2013
rapid set cement
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Brian O’Connell
Untitled #20, 2013
rapid set cement
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
New York New York, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
Paris, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
Bellagio, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Mitzi Pederson
Untitled, 2012
concrete and glitter
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Stephen Prina
Blind No. 16, Fifteen-foot ceiling or lower, (Cadmium Red Medium Hue/Anthraquinone Blue/Primary Yellow/Hansa Yellow Light), 2011
3 panels: acrylic on linen, window blind mechanism
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ben Schumacher
K log 2, Separating Wheat from Chaff #3, 2013
marble, digital picture frame, material from portfolio, inkjet on clear adhesive vinyl
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ben Schumacher
Vogue Apr-Mar 1986, 2012
tempered glass, microfiche, oil paint, inkjet on perforated vinyl, vertical cable management system, hardware
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Torn Cheque, 2013
laser cut linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Torn Cheque, 2013
laser cut linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Chopped Bill, 2013
dye sublimation on linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Chopped Bill, 2013
dye sublimation on linen in road case

Formal Alchemy

June 25, 2013—September 20, 2013

“Alchemy” is the power or process of transforming something common into something special. All three of the artists in “Formal Alchemy” have the ability to create elegant objects out of common ingredients through conceptually interesting processes. In a variety of twists on the tradition of being “true” to materials, Toren, Wermer and Dash exploit physical properties beyond their typical uses. The exhibition bears witness to a conversation about transformation, utility and the authority of pure form.

“formal alchemy” is curated by Jessica Silverman

N. Dash

(b. 1980) combines adobe, a material that is rarely used in painting, with the classic ingredients of art—stretchers, linen and paint. By these means, she probes and enlivens conventional approaches to painting. In Night Light 1 and Night Light 2, Dash creates a dynamic interplay between weight and sensuality of the linen and the careful application of hand painting, thus exploring the sculptural potential of the two-dimensional medium.

Amikam Toren

(b. 1945) is represented in the exhibition by his Stacks sculptures from the 1980’s. Toren’s totemic Stacks involve removing and puling one side of a cardboard box, adding pigment to the pulp, then applying the mixture to canvas in a way that cpatures some aspect of the box (e.g. “This way up” or “Fragile”), then stretching the painted canvas over the opening of the original box. The artist then stacks the paintings, both reasserting their identity as cardboard boxes and proclaiming their status as sculpture.

Nicole Wermers

(b. 1971) starts with diverse natural and man-made objects, subverting them in formally intriguing ways that alter our senses of the everyday. With Water Shelf #1 and Water Shelf #2 (both from 2012), Wermers turns industrial shelving units upside down and transforms them into shallow troughs for holding water. Untitled (bench), 2010, is a transparent acrylic box in a branch-like form that contains three rocks that were handpicked by the artist. One can perch on the work but the plastic may scratch, so the viewer must wrestle with their desire for function. Many of Wermer’s works have a purpose beyond their art objecthood, but it is invariably an impractical one.

photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of N. Dash's Untitled
N. Dash
Untitled, 2013
adobe, acrylic, graphite, jute, twine, wood support
photograph of N. Dash's Night Light 2
N. Dash
Night Light 2, 2013
acrylic, adobe, jute, linen, pigment, watercolor
photograph of N. Dash's Night Light 1
N. Dash
Night Light 1, 2013
acrylic, adobe, jute, linen, pigment, watercolor
photograph of N. Dash's Untitled
N. Dash
Untitled, 2013
adobe, graphite, jute, twine, wood support
photograph Nicole Wermers' Untitled (bench)
Nicole Wermers
Untitled (bench), 2010
plexiglass, rocks
photograph of Nicole Wermers' Untitled (bench)
Nicole Wermers
Untitled (bench), 2010
plexiglass, rocks
photograph of Amikam Toren's Stacks (Five Only)
Amikam Toren
Stacks (Five Only), 1992-1995
cardboard, pulped canvas
photograph of Amikam Toren's Stacks (Six Only)
Amikam Toren
Stacks (Six Only), 1992-1995
cardboard, pulped canvas
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition