Egan Frantz — Captive Vocabulary

May 21, 2015 — June 26, 2015

fused space is pleased to present “Captive Vocabulary,” a solo exhibition of paintings and sculptures by New York-based artist Egan Frantz. The installation reflects Frantz’s ongoing interest in the history of the avant-garde, and its relationship to art, craft and mass production. His mannerist minimalism and brazenly meta-conceptual stance tests the belief structure of art-world cognoscenti.

Frantz’s “Diagram Paintings” are made with different brands of toilet paper and come in three variations based on the aesthetic rules the artist imposes on each brand’s customary length, texture and colors. The first series consists of diptychs in which colored rolls of Renova four-ply paper, a Portuguese brand, are unfurled from right to left across primed surfaces of stretched linen canvas. The resulting red, purple, brown and black works both refer respectfully and wink at Minimalism. The second version utilizes an Italian brand, called Regina, which repeats the letter “R” on each ply. These wall works ape concrete poetry – a style of verse whereby words are used for visual effect rather than literary purpose. In the third iteration, Frantz unravels three rolls of the American Kleenex company’s Cottonelle brand across a 12-foot-long surface, creating an Agnes-Martin-esque abstraction, a grand monochromatic landscape, a rigorous white void. While the works are ostensibly sober – somber even – their materials evoke the humorous spirit of artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Piero Manzoni.

Punctuating the display of these works on canvas is an egg filled with emulsion that has been smashed on the floor. Egg tempera dominated painting for over a thousand years until it was superseded by oil paint in the fifteenth century. Eggs are a running theme in post-war contemporary art from Marcel Broodthaers to Franz West and Sarah Lucas. In addition to suggesting this art history, the painterly sculpture acts as an expressionist outburst or “egg in the face” of the ultra-disciplined “Diagram” paintings.

Stacked on the floor is a “Book Light” sculpture made from heritage board, a material used for the preservation of rare books. Inside the book, in lieu of a text, are motion-activated LED lights. Frantz has also created a marble table engraved with the words “The Avant-Garde Won’t Give Up,” a quote from Asger Jorn, the Danish co-founder of the COBRA and Situationist International movements. When asked if he is deploying the quote in a straightforward or parodic way, Frantz replies, “I’m dead serious. No irony for me.”

Accompanying the work on opening night will be a musical performance by Xeno & Oaklander, an electronics group, which includes Frantz, his wife Liz Wendelbo and friend Sean McBride. The band, who have a cult following, is dedicated to analog production and believes “There is freedom in the minimum.”

Egan Frantz (b. 1986) received his BA in Poetry from Hampshire College in Massachusetts in 2009. He has had solo exhibitions at Galerie Nagel Draxler (Cologne), Jack Tilton Gallery (New York), and Tomorrow Gallery (Toronto). He has been included in group shows at Museum Essl in Vienna and Miguel Abreu Gallery in New York. Frantz lives and works in New York.
Egan Frantz Solo Exhibition
egan frantz - captive Vocabulary
diagram painting no. 12

Erica Mahinay — Thin Skins, Infinity Pools, and Sand Slumps

March 23, 2015 — May 7, 2015

Opening reception: Monday, March 23, 5:30-7:30pm

fused space is pleased to present a solo exhibition of work by LA-based artist Erica Mahinay, titled “Thin Skins, Infinity Pools, and Sand Slumps.” This installation features paintings and sculptures that work as engaging abstractions on one level and evocative figures with allegorical associations on another. With the kind of intense physicality that feels like an antidote to digitization, the works address issues of splendor, narcissism, tragedy and desire.

Mahinay’s “Thin Skin” paintings are made from fabric, plastic, acrylic and sometimes gold leaf. More sculptural than painterly, the sensuous works are stitched together with Frankenstein- like lushness. The title, “Thin Skin,” adds meaning with suggestions of emotional sensitivity and physical fragility, transforming the works into characters in a conceptual beauty pageant that channels the ghost of Lucio Fontana.

Complimenting the conversation are Mahinay’s “Infinity Pools,” which consist of sand- encrusted staircases that ascend to mirrored platforms, which host sculptural still lives of cast-resin and silicon encased fruit along with ceramic oddities. Positioned to reflect the paintings, they re-frame the “Thin Skins,” creating another perspective from which to experience the work. Meanwhile, viewers who happen to peer down, find themselves caught in a Narcissus-like gaze. These sculptures are not stairways to heaven as much as lures that seduce their surroundings into a “vanitas” drama.

The visceral physicality of the show is extended by Mahinay’s “Sand Slumps,” which are fabric forms filled with sand, spray-tanned and crowned with objects on the cusp of legibility. These sculptures have a human, organic quality; sometimes coming across as dolls without features or appendages struggling against gravity in a way that suggests Claes Oldenberg meets Hans Bellmer.

Mahinay’s highly tactile “Thin Skins, Infinity Pools, and Sand Slumps” explores the nobility and ignominy of the body and the boundaries of self-obsession. Intimate and aloof, the exhibition pushes and pulls the viewer into a rich psychological zone characterized by conflicted emotions and oxymoronic thoughts.

Erica Mahinay (b. 1986) received her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan in 2013. From 2009-2010, she was an artist-in-residence at the Vermont Studio Center. Mahinay has had solo exhibitions at Loudhailer Gallery, Los Angeles, and T293, Naples, Italy. Mahinay was born in Sante Fe, New Mexico, and now lives and works in Los Angeles.
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
erica mahinay — thin skins, infinity pools, and sand slumps
Installation view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Gilded (Visions), 2015
Gold leaf on treated fabric
132 x 100 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Gilded (Visions), 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Gilded (Gleam), 2015
Detail
Gold leaf on treated fabric
26 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Half-light (Corridor), 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
26 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Hiatus, 2015
Bleached and treated fabrics
72 x 52 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Hushed Exchange, 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
26 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Shape Shifting (Double Portal), 2015
Oil on canvas, vinyl, treated fabrics
84 x 68 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Shape Shifting (Double Portal), 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sweep (Red, Pink, Pearl), 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
26 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sleepwalk, 2015
Oil and acrylic on treated fabric
132 x 100 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sleepwalk, 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Still Life (with mirror and new fruit), 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
26 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Still Life (with inverted Iris), 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
96 x 72 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Still Life (Half Light), 2015
Oil on canvas, treated fabrics
112 x 144 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Still Life (with inverted Iris), 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Structural shift, 2015
Acrylic on treated fabrics
72 x 52 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Infinity Pool (Scatter), 2015
Sand, etched mirror, silicon encased fruit, silicon molds, resin, caster
75 x 33 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Infinity Pool (Scatter), 2015
Sand, etched mirror, silicon encased fruit, silicon molds, resin, caster
75 x 33 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Infinity Pool (with Alliteration Vessels), 2015
Sand, etched mirror, earthenware, caster
75 x 33 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Infinity Pool (with Alliteration Vessels), 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Infinity Pool (with cabbage), 2015
75 x 33 x 20 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sand Slump (Spray-Tanned with a Pinch of Salt), 2015
Sprayed fabric, sand, earthenware, Himalayan pink salt
18 x 12 x 15 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sand Slump (Spray-Tanned with a Pinch of Salt), 2015
Detail
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Sand Slump (Spray-tanned with Key Limes), 2015
Sprayed fabric, sand, silicon encased fruit, silicon, resin
10 x 13 x 15 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Threshfold 4 Self-Reflection Station, 2015
Hydrocal, silicon encased clementines, upholstery foam, mirror, silicon, casters
23 x 18 x 51 inches
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Threshfold 4 Self-Reflection Station, 2015
Alternate view
Erica Mahinay Solo Exhibition
Erica Mahinay
Threshfold 4 Self-Reflection Station, 2015
Detail

Bare Code Scan

January 22, 2015—March 14, 2015

Upon seeing the skeletal form of her X-rayed hand, Anna Bertha Ludwig exclaimed, “I have seen my death.” Wife of Wilhem Roentgen, the German physicist credited with inventing X-rays, Ludwig was the first human to be photographed using the technology. Roentgen’s X-ray of his wife is at once wholly remarkable and utterly quotidian in its empirical detail; the darkened ring of her wedding band poignantly domesticates the image of Ludwig’s phantom hand. For the four artists included in this group show, titled bare code scan, the field of embodied perception – and its meditation via mechanical and cultural means – is a central theme.

Touching upon the technological enhancement of the visual experience and the spatial horizons erupted by such advances, Cooper Jacoby’s wall-mounted door handles incorporate images of Roentgen’s early experiments with X-rays printed on perforated vinyl. Isolated from their typical role as regulators of thresholds, the handles recede from the haptic into the optic, an interface where access is abstracted and frustrated. The handles hold thermally sensitive materials including canola oil, a hydraulic lubricant later adapted for cooking, which symbolically unites the beholder with the object perceived. Through transparency and materiality, Jacoby foregrounds the dynamics of visual experience while simultaneously encouraging tactile gestures.

Barbara Hammer’s video projection, Sanctus, 1990, appropriates slides from the experimental X-ray films of Dr. James Sibley Watson. The film simultaneously refers to the ability of such technology to expose the body, while also forcibly laying it bare before the beholder. If Jacoby’s work can be understood to incorporate the embodied viewer through tactile means, Hammer distances the perceiving body, locating him or her within the regime of power-inflected observation that Michel Foucault termed the “medical gaze,” whereby the physical body is separated from the personal identity.

In a process that begins with her love of digital scanning, Lucie Stahl’s newest series takes on the formal attributes of the scanner process and applies it to straight photography and sites that have glass partitions. Naturally, the environment of the zoo, where one sees animals, reptiles and objects through an “invisible” wall, came to mind. The fingerprints and scratches from the gorilla in East of Eden or the reflections on the glass in American Grafitti stay within Stahl’s visual vernacular but take on a more voyeuristic sensibility. The photographs are subsequently mounted and coated with resin, creating a further barrier between viewer and the image. Connecting the interior gallery space with its outdoor environs, Stahl’s works foreground the gaze of the beholder, much like a microscope amplifies the ability for a scientist to observe micro-cellular structures. While the clinical observation of Hammer’s works is given over to the voyeur, the eye in Stahl’s photographs becomes free to gaze upon unknowing, unwitting subjects.

By contrast, Sam Lewitt’s copper-clad plastic sculptures bring to the fore the technologies that increasingly control and structure our everyday visual activities. If Stahl’s works foreground the eye as the principal optical mechanism, Lewitt’s work emphasizes the primacy of the computational.

Adopting fabrication techniques used in the production of computer circuitry, Lewitt’s oversized panels monumentalize the otherwise invisible microchips that regulate our optical devices. And, just as Descartes attempted to foreground the processes, which regulated the human eye through his illustrations Dioptrics (1637), so now does Lewitt seemingly do the same for the digital with his Pyralux sculptures. In many ways then, Lewitt’s focus upon circuitry continues the earlier investigations of Roentgen and Watson utilizing technology to lay bare the unseen.

In the case of the four artists exhibited in bare code scan, the reach of technology continues not only to expand our optical capabilities, but to collapse the borders that once demarcated the spheres of private and public visibility, whether via the penetrating gaze of the scientific apparatus or in the voyeuristic glance of the anonymous spectator. In response to this, these artists can be understood to simultaneously erupt and reconsider the complicity of the beholder and the beholden, eschewing a binary that divides the two in favor of a dialectics of perceptibility, which unites them.

Barbara Hammer (b.1939)

has an English Literature and Film degree from San Francisco University and a degree in Multi-Media Digital Studies from the American Film Institute in Los Angeles. She is currently a professor at the European Graduate School Saas-Fee (CH) and has been included in numerous group exhibitions including MOCA (Los Angeles), MoMA PS1 (New York), and Kunsthalle Oslo. Hammer has had film retrospectives at The Tate Modern (London) and MoMA (New York). In 2013, she received a Guggenheim fellowship for her film Waking up Together, on the poet Elizabeth Bishop. Hammer lives and works in New York.

Cooper Jacoby (b.1989)

received his BFA from Bard College. He has been included in group shows at CLEARING (New York), BA&D (Dusseldorf), and Mathew (New York). He is in upcoming shows at High Art (Paris) and White Flag Projects (St. Louis). Jacoby lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Lucie Stahl (b.1977)

attended the Glasgow School of Art and Staedelschule, Frankfurt am Main. Stahl has been included in solo shows at Neue Alte Brücke (Frankfurt), Freedman Fitzpatrick (Los Angeles) and Gio Marconi (Milano). She has had work in numerous group exhibitions including Sculpture Center (New York), Meyer-Kainer (Vienna), Vilma Gold (London), and Night Gallery (Los Angeles). Stahl lives and works between Los Angeles and Berlin.

Sam Lewitt (b.1981)

attended the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art. He has been included in solo shows at Miguel Abreu Gallery (New York), Galerie Buchholz (Cologne), and Gallery Taka Ishii (Kyoto). He was included in the 2012 Whitney Biennial (NY). Lewitt has had work in group exhibitions at institutions such as Fridericianum (Kassel, Germany) and MoMA PS1 (New York). He has an upcoming solo exhibition at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art (San Francisco) and at the Leopold-Hoesch-Museum (Düren, Germany). Lewitt lives and works in New York.

photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
bare code scan
Installation view
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Toxic Variable, 2015
Door handle: powder-coated steel, lucite, canola oil;
tempered glass, perforated vinyl
76 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Toxic Variable, 2015
Detail
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Optimal Clot, 2015
Door handle: powder-coated steel, lucite, ferrofluid;
black mirror, perforated vinyl
76 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Optimal Clot, 2015
Detail
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Optimal Clot, 2015
Door handle: powder-coated steel, lucite, ferrofluid;
black mirror, perforated vinyl
76 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Cooper Jacoby
Optimal Clot, 2015
Detail
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Lucie Stahl
East of Eden, 2014
Inkjet print, aluminum, epoxy resin
60 x 43 x 1 inches
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Lucie Stahl
American Graffiti, 2014
Inkjet print, aluminum, epoxy resin
60 x 43 x 1 inches
photograph of bare code scan exhibition
Lucie Stahl
The Descent, 2014
Inkjet print, aluminum, epoxy resin
66 x 47 x 1 inches

Openings

November 19, 2014—January 10, 2015

Fused Space is pleased to present a new group show entitled “Openings”. Featuring works by Milano Chow, Chris Duncan, Owen Kydd and Lauren McKeon, this multi-media exhibition takes apertures as its thematic thread and explores the representation of absence, whether corporal or spatial.

Through each artist’s interpretation of portals such as windows, stairs and other entryways, the viewer is able to be a critical part of the creation of meaning, literally being placed within the frame of the artwork. Our position as a viewer is actively called into question, as are questions of looking and being seen, voyeurism and objectification. These voids, as created by the portals, are also sites for potential action- rhetorical invitations to enter and exit simultaneously or to simply ponder what lies beyond.

Milano Chow (b.1987)

received her BA in Art History from Barnard College in 2009 and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013. She has been in included group shows at Wallsapce (New York), 356 Mission (Los Angeles) and LVL3 (Chicago) and has forthcoming solo exhibitions at Young Art (Los Angeles) and Chapter NY (New York). Chow lives and works in Los Angeles, CA where she runs a publishing imprint called Oso Press.

Chris Duncan (b.1974)

received his MFA from Stanford in 2013. Duncan has had solo shows at Cooper Cole Gallery (Toronto), Morgan Lehman Gallery (New York), and Jeff Bailey Gallery (New York). His work is in the public collections of MoMA (New York), MoMA (San Francisco), and The Berkeley Art Museum (Berkeley). He lives and works in Oakland, CA where he also organizes events and runs a small artist book press and record label called LAND AND SEA.

Owen Kydd (b.1975)

received his MFA from UCLA in 2011. He has had solo shows at Document (Chicago), The Vancouver Art Gallery (Vancouver), and Nicelle Beauchene (New York). His work was recently included in group shows at FOAM (Amsterdam), The International Center of Photography (New York), and Thomas Zander Galerie (Cologne). Kydd’s work is in the public collections of Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), LACMA (Los Angeles), The Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), and the Metropolitan Museum (New York). He lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Lauren McKeon (b.1983)

received her MFA from San Francisco State University in 2014. Her work has been included in exhibitions at Root Division (San Francisco), Laurel Gitlen (New York), and Blankspace Gallery (Oakland). McKeon’s work is in the public collection of Deutsche Bank (New York). She is currently in residence at Headlands Center for The Arts and is the creator and editor of SPLITS, a publication to support new collaborations between dancers and visual artists. McKeon lives and works in Marin, CA.

photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Milano Chow, Lauren McKeon and Chris Duncan
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd, Lauren McKeon and Milano Chow
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Lauren McKeon, Chris Duncan and Owen Kydd
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Lauren McKeon and Chris Duncan
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd and Lauren McKeon
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd
photograph of openings exhibition
Openings
Installation view, 2014
Featuring Owen Kydd and Lauren McKeon
Chris_Ducan_01.jpg
Chris Ducan
BEDROOM WINDOW (red) 6 month exposure winter-summer, 2014
Sunlight, time and cotton fabric 54 x 68 inches
Chris_Ducan_02.jpg
Chris Ducan
BEDROOM WINDOW (blue) 6 month exposure winter-summer, 2013
Sunlight, time and cotton fabric 54 x 68 inches
Chris_Ducan_03.jpg
Chris Ducan
BEDROOM WINDOW (black) 6 month exposure summer-winter, 2013
Sunlight, time and cotton fabric 54 x 68 inches
Lauren_McKeon_01.jpg
Lauren McKeon
Beginnings and Ends 1, 2014
Plywood and gesso
Dimensions variable
Lauren_McKeon_02.jpg
Lauren McKeon
Beginnings and Ends 2, 2014
Plywood, cardboard, gesso
Dimensions variable
Lauren_McKeon_03.jpg
Lauren McKeon
Beginnings and Ends 3, 2014
Plywood and gesso
Dimensions variable
Lauren_McKeon_04.jpg
Lauren McKeon
Beginnings and Ends 4, 2014
Plywood and gesso
Dimensions variable
Lauren_McKeon_05.jpg
Lauren McKeon
Beginnings and Ends 5, 2014
Fabric and sand
Dimensions variable

A Topography of Chance

June 26, 2014—September 20, 2014

This group exhibition is inspired by Daniel Spoerri’s An Anecdoted Topography of Chance, a classic Fluxus artist book. Like Spoerri’s publication, the artworks suggest that chance is not random, but shaped by rituals and repetition. Through a broad range of media, Bruce Nauman, Brie Ruais, Rose Marcus, and Aaron Garber-Maikovska explore the predictability of the accident and the fortuity of pattern, especially those mediated by the body.

Bruce Nauman (b. 1941, Fort Wayne, IN).

In Setting a Good Corner (Allegory and Metaphor) (1991), Nauman constructs a fence on his ranch in New Mexico for the length of the fifty-minute video. The static camera captures the artist while he digs holes, secures foundations and sets tension wires. The work expands Nauman’s studio to embrace his backyard and captures his distinctive rhythms. Always a protagonist in his work, Nauman’s activity ends up framing himself with his fence.

Brie Ruais (b. 1982, Santa Ana, CA).

Ruais works with clay, kneading, pushing, kicking, tearing and squeezing it. The resulting forms are abstract and intimately tied to physical action. Double Fold and Unfold, 130lbs is partly titled after her body weight, while Holding a Good Corner, 266lbs (2014) shows the trace of repetitive gestures made by Ruais and her boyfriend. Her work suggests a battle between persistence and gravity, human determination and the power of materials.

Rose Marcus (b. 1982, Atlanta, GA).

Marcus’s photographs explore liminal times and spaces, directing our attention to the lulls in between the action and the locations that are rarely the main attraction. Printed on vinyl and adhered directly to the wall, the works in this new series capture reflections, positioning store windows and urban glass as lenses into another dimension. Often containing the artist’s own reflection, these photographs suggest the “aesthetic stubbornness,” as Marcus puts it, of our cities and ourselves.

Aaron Garber-Maikovska (b. 1978, Washington DC)

is a performance artist who makes works in a range of media, including videos of elaborate hand dances and abstract paintings that involve highly ambiguous gestures. Garber-Maikovska’s paintings are suggestive of graffiti, Chinese characters, anthropomorphic figures and pictograms. Composed from doodles drawn on acetate then projected at a totemic scale, they are charged with performative energy that has been described as a “future comedy.”

photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
A Topography of Chance
installation view, 2014
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Bruce Nauman
Setting a Good Corner (Allegory and Metaphor), 1999
Video (color, sound)
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Spread Open to the Floor, 130 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Spread Open to the Floor, 130 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Double Fold and Unfold, 130 lbs, 2013
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Brie Ruais
Holding a Good Corner, 266 lbs, 2014
Glazed ceramic and hardware
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Arm, 2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Folded (arms), 2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Man (cartesian?), 2013/2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Rose Marcus
Travel (turing), 2013/2014
Inkjet print on adhesive vinyl
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Untitled, 2014
Ink on chalk pastel on archival gator board, in artist’s frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Untitled, 2014
Ink on chalk pastel on archival gator board, in artist’s frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Sheila, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Jeanette with kids, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
Larry, 2014
Ink on archival gator board, mounted on aluminum frame
photograph of A Topography of Chance exhibition
Aaron Garber-Maikovska
T.G.I.Friday’s, 2014
HD Video and metal armature

Inners

February 27, 2014—June 5, 2014

fused space is pleased to present “Inners,” a site-specific exhibition of new work by Julian Hoeber, curated by Jessica Silverman. Using a range of media, including installation, wall sculptures, paintings and works on paper, the show explores the formal and psychological aspects of symmetry, distortion, inside and outside. Rich in art historical associations, the work is in dialogue with artists as diverse as Hans Arp, Lygia Clark, Sol LeWitt, Mike Kelley and Joe Goode.

The show centers on an installation of two impractical staircase-like structures. One set of “stairs” ascends to nowhere; the other lies on its side, rendered as a zigzagged wall. Each staircase creates a sequestered space within the gallery. Hoeber has made enclosures that are both peculiar closets and hiding places, which have intense cultural connotations. Inside these “rooms” are paintings and works on paper that allude to more colorful, irrational, organic forms.

Julian Hoeber

Julian Hoeber (b. 1974) holds a B.A. in Art History from Tufts University, a B.F.A from the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an M.F.A. from the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. His work has been included in exhibitions at the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL; Western Bridge, Seattle, WA; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, CA; and Deste Foundation Centre for Contemporary Art, Athens.

photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Blue Wound, 2013
Acrylic on linen
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #80 (CS, Q1, URJ, LC, Q2, ULJ, LC, Q3, LRJ, LC, Q4, LLJ, LC), 2014
Acrylic on panel
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #81 (CS, Q1, CJ, DC, Q2, CJ, DC, Q3, LMJ, DC, Q4, RMJ, DC), 2014
Acrylic on panel
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Execution Changes #82, 83 (CS, Q1, URJ, DC, Q2, ULJ, DC, Q3, URJ, DC, Q4, LLJ, DC) (CS, Q1, URJ, DC, Q2, ULJ, DC, Q3, LRJ, DC, Q4, ULJ, DC), 2014
Acrylic on linen
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Pussies, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Little Cave, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #18, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #19, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #20, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #21, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #22, 2013
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #24, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Construction #25: Good Fuck, 2014
Latex enamel on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave X, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Asshole, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Schematic #1, 2014
Gesso and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Schematic #2, 2014
Gesso and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #3, 2014
Gouache and collage on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #4, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #5, 2014
Gouache and colored pencil on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #6, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Drawing #7, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Offset Rectangle Cave, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Diptych, 2014
Gouache on paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Untitled (Limbs), 2014
Cherry wood with oil and wax finish, glass, epoxy, polyester resin, fiberglass, and acrylic paint
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Study #1, 2013
Colored pencil and graphite on brown paper
photograph of Inners exhibition
Julian Hoeber
Cave Painting #1, 2013
Acrylic on laminated plywood
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014
photograph of Inners exhibition
Inners
installation view, 2014

architecture undigested

October 9, 2013—January 10, 2014

“architecture undigested” features artists whose works engage with the built environment in surreal and thought-provoking ways. The exhibition presents a range of works that riff on building elements from moving walls and misplaced window blinds to casino carpets and anti-slip guards gone rogue. The cumulative effect suggests an imploded house - one that subverts the distinction between structure and adornment. Although these works resist the use of exotic and expensive materials and thwart the comforts of home, they bring an odd intimacy to what might otherwise be perceived as industrial.

The show includes works by Marte Eknæs, Petros Moris, Brian O’Connell, Ruairiadh O’Connell, Mitzi Pederson, Stephen Prina, Ben Schumacher and Hugh Scott-Douglas.

“architecture undigested” is curated by Jessica Silverman.

Marte Eknæs

(b. 1978, Elverum, Norway). Eknæs’s Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna) (2013), is a ten-foot-long door-sweep hung six inches above the floor. Similarly, Anti-slip III (Gråmølna) (2013), is an anti-slip guard installed in the wrong place. Both works transform the practical accessories of public buildings into thought-provoking sculptures. Eknæs is known for her interrogative approach to materials and concern for the structure of man-made objects.

Petros Moris

(b. 1986, Lamia, Greece). Moris’s Commons 2, 3 and 4 (2013) are three hybridic works, which fuse mosaics with pure gray colorfields. Moris has coated three foam construction panels with synthetic polymer plaster that has been reinforced with glass-fiber. He then mounts a mosaic of unglazed ceramic tiles onto the surface, creating a fragmented mural space. He uses pre-industrial, industrial and post-industrial techniques to create works that look like science-fiction antiques.

Brian O’Connell

(b. 1972, Leuven, Belgium). O’Connell’s “Concrete Paintings” are made by pouring concrete into wooden molds, which then twist and bend under the weight of the added material. The works refer to Brutalist architecture’s use of molded concrete, but further subvert their industrial materials by containing them within the framework of traditional painting. These “paintings” are connected to O’Connell’s practice of interrogating the interrelated natures of weight, pressure, and light—examining behaviors of various materials.

Ruairiadh O’Connell

(b. 1983, Aberdeen, Scotland). O’Connell’s three wax-based silkscreens hijack their designs from casino carpets that are meant to keep gamblers awake and ambitious, transforming them into pure studies of motif and pattern. By transforming their materials and taking the patterns from the floor to the wall (thereby elevating their positions), the resulting artworks disrupt the intended spatial and psychological functions of their sources.

Mitzi Pederson

(b. 1976, Stuart, Florida). Pederson’s sculptures are made from shattered cinderblocks, arranged in low, horizontal configurations. Their edges are lined with black and gray glitter. In these works, conventional concrete masonry shatters and takes on a formal beauty.

Stephen Prina

(b. 1954, Galesburg, Illinois). Prina’s window-blind works, which are made on conventionally produced linen roller blinds, function both as paintings and sculptural installations. The application of brilliant colors with abstract, gestural brushstrokes on household material recalls the work of modernists such as Piet Mondrian and Barnet Newman. Positioned in the center of the room, their painterly surfaces double as architectural bodies that reorient the gallery’s space.

Ben Schumacher

(b. 1985, Kitchener, Canada). Schumacher’s sculpture, Vogue Apr-Mar 1986 (2012) is a vertical, glass partition covered with perforated vinyl used in commercial advertising, held together by a cable-management rack. The work disrupts visibility, yet hints at transparency. The microfilm transfers and vinyl on the backside of the work simultaneously allow perception through a facade and create a surface embedded with information and imagery.

Hugh Scott-Douglas

(b. 1988, Cambridge, UK). Scott-Douglas’s “road-cases” are multi-functional objects that act simultaneously as sculptures, movable walls and frames. The road-cases also display two kinds of Scott-Douglas’s paintings: Chopped Bill (2013) is made from a high resolution scan of the small ink stamps found on American $100 bills; the other, Torn Cheque (2013), is an abstract pattern on a white gessoed canvas made by a laser cutter. The works suggest the incessant travel of information, objects, currency, and people through space.

photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Architecture Undigested
installation view, 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna), 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Better furnished, more fortunate III (Gråmølna), 2013
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Marte Eknæs
Anti-slip VI, 2013
non-slip tape
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Petros Moris
Commons02, 2013
Commons03, 2013
Commons05, 2013
unglazed fired ceramic tiles, extruded polystyrene rigid foam construction panels coated with synthetic polymer plaster and reinforced with glass-fibre
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Brian O’Connell
Untitled #14, 2013
rapid set cement
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Brian O’Connell
Untitled #20, 2013
rapid set cement
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
New York New York, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
Paris, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ruairiadh O’Connell
Bellagio, 2013
silkscreen on wax in welded steel tray
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Mitzi Pederson
Untitled, 2012
concrete and glitter
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Stephen Prina
Blind No. 16, Fifteen-foot ceiling or lower, (Cadmium Red Medium Hue/Anthraquinone Blue/Primary Yellow/Hansa Yellow Light), 2011
3 panels: acrylic on linen, window blind mechanism
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ben Schumacher
K log 2, Separating Wheat from Chaff #3, 2013
marble, digital picture frame, material from portfolio, inkjet on clear adhesive vinyl
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Ben Schumacher
Vogue Apr-Mar 1986, 2012
tempered glass, microfiche, oil paint, inkjet on perforated vinyl, vertical cable management system, hardware
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Torn Cheque, 2013
laser cut linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Torn Cheque, 2013
laser cut linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Chopped Bill, 2013
dye sublimation on linen in road case
photograph of Architecture Undigested exhibition
Hugh Scott-Douglas
Chopped Bill, 2013
dye sublimation on linen in road case

Formal Alchemy

June 25, 2013—September 20, 2013

“Alchemy” is the power or process of transforming something common into something special. All three of the artists in “Formal Alchemy” have the ability to create elegant objects out of common ingredients through conceptually interesting processes. In a variety of twists on the tradition of being “true” to materials, Toren, Wermer and Dash exploit physical properties beyond their typical uses. The exhibition bears witness to a conversation about transformation, utility and the authority of pure form.

“formal alchemy” is curated by Jessica Silverman

N. Dash

(b. 1980) combines adobe, a material that is rarely used in painting, with the classic ingredients of art—stretchers, linen and paint. By these means, she probes and enlivens conventional approaches to painting. In Night Light 1 and Night Light 2, Dash creates a dynamic interplay between weight and sensuality of the linen and the careful application of hand painting, thus exploring the sculptural potential of the two-dimensional medium.

Amikam Toren

(b. 1945) is represented in the exhibition by his Stacks sculptures from the 1980’s. Toren’s totemic Stacks involve removing and puling one side of a cardboard box, adding pigment to the pulp, then applying the mixture to canvas in a way that cpatures some aspect of the box (e.g. “This way up” or “Fragile”), then stretching the painted canvas over the opening of the original box. The artist then stacks the paintings, both reasserting their identity as cardboard boxes and proclaiming their status as sculpture.

Nicole Wermers

(b. 1971) starts with diverse natural and man-made objects, subverting them in formally intriguing ways that alter our senses of the everyday. With Water Shelf #1 and Water Shelf #2 (both from 2012), Wermers turns industrial shelving units upside down and transforms them into shallow troughs for holding water. Untitled (bench), 2010, is a transparent acrylic box in a branch-like form that contains three rocks that were handpicked by the artist. One can perch on the work but the plastic may scratch, so the viewer must wrestle with their desire for function. Many of Wermer’s works have a purpose beyond their art objecthood, but it is invariably an impractical one.

photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of N. Dash's Untitled
N. Dash
Untitled, 2013
adobe, acrylic, graphite, jute, twine, wood support
photograph of N. Dash's Night Light 2
N. Dash
Night Light 2, 2013
acrylic, adobe, jute, linen, pigment, watercolor
photograph of N. Dash's Night Light 1
N. Dash
Night Light 1, 2013
acrylic, adobe, jute, linen, pigment, watercolor
photograph of N. Dash's Untitled
N. Dash
Untitled, 2013
adobe, graphite, jute, twine, wood support
photograph Nicole Wermers' Untitled (bench)
Nicole Wermers
Untitled (bench), 2010
plexiglass, rocks
photograph of Nicole Wermers' Untitled (bench)
Nicole Wermers
Untitled (bench), 2010
plexiglass, rocks
photograph of Amikam Toren's Stacks (Five Only)
Amikam Toren
Stacks (Five Only), 1992-1995
cardboard, pulped canvas
photograph of Amikam Toren's Stacks (Six Only)
Amikam Toren
Stacks (Six Only), 1992-1995
cardboard, pulped canvas
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition
photograph of Formal Alchemy exhibition